Predicting the Unpredictable. Like the Weather in Seattle.

I’m sitting here writing this as I look outside and see...a gray, cloudy, not very warm type of day outside. Which is really depressing. Mostly due to the fact that it was in the 80’s this entire week up until today (the weekend).

And I had actually made plans to go outside. Well the plans are still in place. But it’d be nice if the sun came out for it!

This is such a Seattle-like thing to happen.

It’s nice out, it’s nice out, then suddenly when you have a purpose for the nice weather, it’s gone.

Ugh.

That’s a typical thing that’s going to happen when you’re shooting outside in Washington.

You really never know what you’re going to get!

So it’s always really handy to stay prepared. Make sure you have a back-up plan in case of the weather or just plan to reschedule if needed. There’s definitely some cools ways to do shoots in the rain (again if you’re prepared, that photo equipment is probably not waterproof - and there's ways to protect that gear!) or snow or whatnot.

And if you’re somebody that’s brand new to either shooting or being shot, random weather changes can put a damper on the day. The best thing you can do is to be prepared for anything.

When you’re a photographer that’s a major thing you’ll learn about, either the easy way or the hard way. Because anything and everything can and will go wrong during a shoot. If you’re not ready for it!

If you’re somebody that is being photographed or are a part of a shoot that is weather dependent, you should also be prepared for anything! Anticipate anything. Figure out what you’re going to do with your hair if it changes form when it gets wet (like mine) or if you can still walk in those shoes through a spontaneous snowfall.

Now as a product shooter who works inside in a nice and cozy (and dark) studio, I don’t typically have a weather dependent problem. At least not one that’s work related. Just social related. That’s a plus side to doing studio photography. Although I’m not against shooting product on location, those can turn out to be pretty dynamic and eye catching looking imagery.

It’s good thing to keep in mind when doing most things in Washington. Cause it can literally go from dull and gray to bright and sunny in minutes. And change back. And change again. And again.

That’s Washington for you.

I have to say it’s been an amazing summer so far. It’s hardly rained (which I think may not be the best sign…) and we’ve had a ton of hot sunny days! We’re all soaking it up while we can because sooner then we know it, it’ll probably start snowing. Or hailing. Or whatever.

And anyways, so what if it does start snowing in the middle of your shoot? Or maybe a cool tornado? I mean did you see those wedding photo’s that this couple had taken when a wildfire broke out during their big day??

You can see those here: http://petapixel.com/2014/06/10/striking-wedding-photos-shot-massive-wildfire-backdrop-go-viral/

Not that I’m condoning creating or causing some kind of disaster to make your shoot cooler. (Please don’t just like a forest on fire!)

But you never know what may happen, roll with the punches and embrace the day. It might just turn out to be worthwhile.

With that being said, I am venturing into the outside world. Get some fresh air, interact with people, eat food, you know, be normal.

Do you know someone that may benefit from this information? Maybe they’re just nervous to shoot outside as a Washington resident or is someone going into a photoshoot with a little bit of anxiousness on weather changes.

Share this article!

Maybe some words of encouragement is all they need to inspire what could be some really rare or amazing work to turn up. Get that work to turn up. I’m not telling you to get turnt up but you know what I mean. (Unless you really want to, it’s a free country.)

Till next time,

Anne “The Washingtonian” Cho